News Local

Nuclear cleanup company hiring in Port Hope

By Valerie MacDonald, Northumberland Today

CNL wastewater manager Pierce LeBel holds two jars. On the left is untreated water from the LLRW mount storage site pictured over his shoulder. The other jar is what the water looks like coming out of the plant before it goes into Lake Ontario. VALERIE MACDONALD/NORTHUMBERLAND TODAY

CNL wastewater manager Pierce LeBel holds two jars. On the left is untreated water from the LLRW mount storage site pictured over his shoulder. The other jar is what the water looks like coming out of the plant before it goes into Lake Ontario. VALERIE MACDONALD/NORTHUMBERLAND TODAY

PORT HOPE -- The vacant jobs at Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL), which is handling the ongoing, multi-million-dollar Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) cleanup in Port Hope, are among about 200 which the national nuclear company has open.

Deborah Whelan-Payne, talent acquistion partner for the Historic Waste Program Management Office, talked about the opportunities during a recent interview.

"At this time there are about 20 jobs open (in Port Hope), she said. "The jobs range from clerical to management "¦ including project managers."

This week, CNL, headquartered in Chalk River, announced it is planning to add 200 research staff over the next three years "to accommodate the company's anticipated growth in nuclear science and technology services.

"The hiring will be carried out to support CNL's Long-Term Strategy, an ambitious 10-year plan that will position the organization as a global leader in nuclear science and technology, during which CNL's research staffing is projected to grow by more than 20 per cent," the release also stated.

CNL's vice-president of research and development, Kathy McCarthy, states in the same release: "As CNL enters this period of organizational growth, our biggest challenge will be to augment our high-calibre research and development team, build strength in new capability areas, and effectively replace those who are planning to retire."

The lab at Chalk River is being revamped to the tune of $1.2-billion to support nuclear research and "evolving science and technology needs of the Canadian and global nuclear industry, and is designed to spur commercial growth as the company transitions to alternate areas of work. CNL intends to pursue a variety of new technologies and services as part of its transformation, including the deployment of small modular reactors in Canada and the use of hydrogen to decarbonise the country`s transportation sector."

Local riding MP Kim Rudd, who is also Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, has talked about the use of small modular reactors as a potential part of Canada's energy plan, especially for industry in the north, including mining, where energy is needed at an affordable cost.

Those interested in local CNL job opportunities can go to www.phai.ca/www.cnl.ca or email deborah.whelan-payne@cnl.ca or for those at Chalk River www.cnl.ca

vmacdonald@postmedia.com

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