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Shoreline studies: Northumberland conservation authorities turn to municipalities for funding help

By Valerie MacDonald, Northumberland Today

Jack Shallhorn takes a break along the lakeshore by the A.K. Sculthorpe Woodland Marsh on Oct. 3 in Port Hope. Rocks have washed over the trail, trees have disappeared from the high water. What used to be a parking lot by Gage's Creek has almost been transformed into the perfect beach area. Pete Fisher/Northumberland Today file photo

Jack Shallhorn takes a break along the lakeshore by the A.K. Sculthorpe Woodland Marsh on Oct. 3 in Port Hope. Rocks have washed over the trail, trees have disappeared from the high water. What used to be a parking lot by Gage's Creek has almost been transformed into the perfect beach area. Pete Fisher/Northumberland Today file photo

LAKE ONTARIO -- Conservation authorities along the southern shore of Lake Ontario are asking municipalities to support a shoreline study whose catalyst is funding from the national disaster mitigation program.

This year, high lake levels impacted municipal, business, residential and other private properties and among other things, the study would look at erosion hazards and recommend approaches for shore protection, Lower Trent Conservation Authority's water resources and development services representative Janet Noyes explained to Alnwick/Haldimand township councillors at their most recent meeting.

To fund the project, the Lower Trent, Central Lake Ontario and Ganaraska Region Conservation Authorities are asking for $6,250 next year as well as the year after from Alnwick/Halidmand, Brighton, Cramahe and Quinte West, states correspondence received by the township.

"The benefits of completing the plan are: A current hydrodynamic model for the entire shoreline that is built with current data; Flood levels, erosion hazards, and dynamic beaches identified; Recommended approaches for shore protection; and recommendations for planning implications (zoning) and Official Plan inputs."

The balance of the funding would come from the upper tier government.

"It's an opportune time to update," Noyes said.

High water levels in Lake Ontario created a lot of erosion this year, she noted.

A forecast of water levels using data from the International Joint Commission shows that if there is another wet spring, they will be repeated.

vmacdonald@postmedia.com

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