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Port Hope woman gets special version of Queen's Jubilee Medal

Cecilia Nasmith

By Cecilia Nasmith, Northumberland Today

Submitted Photo
Port Hope resident Karyn Kennedy is seen with Federal Minister of Justice Rob Nicholson, who nominated he for the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal for her work in helping children who are at risk of or who have been victims of abuse.

Submitted Photo Port Hope resident Karyn Kennedy is seen with Federal Minister of Justice Rob Nicholson, who nominated he for the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal for her work in helping children who are at risk of or who have been victims of abuse.

PORT HOPE - 

While tens of thousands of Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal winners received their award in their home communities, Port Hope resident Karyn Kennedy received hers this week in Ottawa.

Kennedy's medal is kind of a special case.

Whereas the federal government has distributed most of these medals to municipalities to honour those who contribute to the quality of life in these communities, Kennedy explained in a recent interview, a certain number of the medals were retained for the government to distribute at its own discretion. Kennedy was nominated by Federal Minister of Justice Rob Nicholson, and was one of six recipients to receive the medal from the Governor-General.

Karyn Kennedy is the executive director of Boost, which has worked in the field of child-abuse prevention and intervention for 30 years. Its head office is in Toronto. Five years ago, it opened a central-region office in Peterborough to serve Northumberland County as well as the Peterborough and Lindsay areas.

Kennedy began her work in this field as an art therapist with local school boards some 20 years ago.

"Most of the work I have done for the last number of years has been in developing and implementing programs for children who are either at risk of abuse or who have been abused and require services," she said in a telephone interview from her Toronto office.

Kennedy moved to Port Hope 10 years ago, and quickly became involved with the Children's Aid Society of Northumberland. She was co-chair of the board when it amalgamated and became Highland Shores Children's Aid Society. She is just completing a term as vice-president of the Highland board.

"As much as my work here day-to-day is in the city, and I commute on the VIA train, I am also very involved in protecting children in my local community," she said.

cecilia.nasmith@sunmedia.ca

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